Aeronautics Commission grant assists Savage Storm Aviation Science Camp

DURANT, Okla. – Approximately 40 students in grades 8th through 10th will get a chance to attend an aviation camp next summer at Southeastern Oklahoma State University in Durant free of charge, thanks in large part to a $20,000 aviation education grant from the Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission.

The Commission recently approved the grant for Southeastern’s Office of Continuing Education, which will go toward costs associated with the University’s  “Savage Storm Aviation Science Camp 2013” slated for next June. The grant will help provide flight costs, materials, meals and lodging for students who will be participating in the two, week-long camps.

“Southeastern has done a tremendous job over the years of exposing many young people, particularly in that part of the state, to the wonders of flight and careers in aviation and aerospace,” said Victor Bird, director of the Commission, who noted that the university has one of the few aviation management programs in the state. “We need more programs like that if we are to get more young people interested in pursuing STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) careers, especially in aviation and aerospace.”
Scott Hensley, director of Southeastern’s Office of Continuing Education, stated that the grant will help the university reach more young people, even those living in North Texas.
“During our last camp, we received some excellent feedback from parents who said they were very excited that their kids got to attend the camp for free. We also got some good feedback from the campers themselves, many of whom said they, too, were excited about the camp and were looking more closely at STEM areas,” Hensley said. “That was one of our main goals, to get them excited about STEM, and aviation covers so much of that.”
Since 2000, the Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission has awarded approximately $1.6 million in aviation education grants and contracts to various camps, flight academies and other worthwhile aviation and STEM education activities across the state. During the current fiscal year, the Commission has provided more than $200,000 in education funding.

Dr. David Conway elected chair of Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission

Dr. David Conway was recently elected chairman of the Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission.

DURANT, Okla. – Dr. David Conway of Durant was recently elected chairman of the Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission, succeeding Tulsa’s Rick Armstrong whose chairmanship ended June 30.

Conway, director of the Southeastern Oklahoma State University Aviation Sciences Institute, will lead the seven-member board that is responsible for encouraging, fostering and assisting in the development of aviation in Oklahoma. This includes the preservation and improvement of the Oklahoma Airport System and promotion of the state’s top employer — the aerospace industry.

“It’s a privilege and an honor for me to serve as the Aeronautics Commission’s next chairman. The success of our state’s aviation and aerospace industry is critical to our state’s economic future. I am looking forward to working with my fellow board members to expand and strengthen this vital industry in our state,” Conway said.

Conway previously served as chair of the Southeastern Aerospace Department and has been a member of the faculty since 1998. In 2003, he received the University’s Faculty Senate Award for Excellence in Service.

An avid pilot who holds commercial, instrument, CFI and multi-engine ratings, Conway retired as a command pilot from the United States Air Force, where he served as an instructor pilot and evaluator pilot in the Cessna T-37 and Boeing KC-135. He is also one of a handful of flight-rated aerospace physiologists.

Conway earned his Bachelor of Science at Texas A&M – Commerce, Master of Science at the University of Southern California, and Doctorate of Education from Oklahoma State University, and has completed coursework in human factors and physiology at specialized schools across the country, including OSU’s College of Osteopathic Medicine.

He has had numerous articles published in various journals and magazines focusing on human factors in aviation. In addition, Conway recently completed three programs at Harvard University: The Art of Discussion Leadership, Management & Leadership in Education, and Crisis Leadership, as well as a fellowship in Higher Education Management at Vanderbilt University. He is currently attending Harvard’s Institute for Educational Management.

Other newly elected officers are Joe Harris of Blackwell, vice chairman, and Dave Amis III of Oklahoma City, secretary. Besides Armstrong, the other members of the Commission include Michael Ray of Guymon; Tom Stephenson of Oklahoma City; and Wes Stucky of Ardmore.

Oklahoma’s aviation and aerospace industry is one of the state’s largest employers, resulting in approximately 144,000 jobs statewide. The industry yields an annual industrial output of $12.5 billion and generates an annual payroll of $5 billion. One in 11 Oklahomans derive their income from the aviation and aerospace industry with an average salary of nearly $55,000 compared to about $30,000 for the average Oklahoman.

Oklahoma is also one of seven centers in the world for the modification, maintenance, repair and overhaul of aircraft, boasting the world’s largest military aircraft repair facility, Tinker Air Force Base, and the world’s largest commercial aircraft repair facility, the American Airlines Engineering Maintenance and Engineering Center in Tulsa. In addition, Oklahoma has 111 publicly owned airports, placing it 10th nationally for the number of public airports per capita. A total of 43 of those airports are jet capable, meaning their runways are at least 5,000 feet long, the minimum distance needed by most jet aircraft to safely land or take off. Approximately 93 percent of the state’s population lives within 25 miles of an airport with a jet-capable runway.

Dr. David Conway selected Vice Chairman of Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission

Dr. David Conway selected Vice Chairman of Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission

Press Release Date: 7-21-2011

Dr. David Conway

DURANT – Dr. David Conway of Southeastern Oklahoma State University was recently elected vice chairman of the Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission for the current fiscal year, which ends June 30, 2012.

Other newly-elected officers of the seven-member board are Rick Armstrong of Tulsa, chairman, and Joe Harris of Blackwell, secretary. The remaining members of the Aeronautics Commission include Wes Stucky of Ardmore, who served as chairman this past fiscal year; Dave Amis III and Tom Stephenson, both of Oklahoma City; and Michael Ray of Guymon.

Conway serves as director of Southeastern’s Aviation Sciences Institute. Previously, he served as chair of the Aerospace Department and he has been a member of the Southeastern faculty since 1998. In 2003, he received the University’s Faculty Senate Award for Excellence in Service.

An avid pilot who holds commercial, instrument, CFI and multiengine ratings, Conway retired as a command pilot from the United States Air Force where he served as an instructor pilot and evaluator pilot in the Cessna T-37 and Boeing KC-135. He is also one of a handful of flight-rated aerospace physiologists.

Conway earned his Bachelor of Science at Texas A&M–Commerce, Master of Science at the University of Southern California, and Doctorate of Education from Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, and has completed coursework in human factors and physiology at specialized schools across the country, including OSU’s College of Osteopathic Medicine.

He has had numerous articles published in various journals and magazines focusing on human factors in aviation. In addition, Conway recently completed three programs at Harvard University: The Art of Discussion Leadership, Management & Leadership in Education, and Crisis Leadership, as well as a fellowship in Higher Education Management at Vanderbilt University.

The aeronautics board is responsible for encouraging, fostering and assisting in the development of aviation in Oklahoma. This includes the preservation and improvement of the Oklahoma Airport System and promotion of the aerospace industry.

Oklahoma’s aviation and aerospace industry is one of the state’s largest employers, resulting in approximately 144,000 jobs statewide. The industry yields an annual industrial output of $12.5 billion and generates an annual payroll of $5 billion. One in 11 Oklahomans derive their income from the aviation and aerospace industry with an average salary of nearly $55,000 compared to about $30,000 for the average Oklahoman.

Oklahoma is also one of seven centers in the world for the modification, maintenance, repair and overhaul of aircraft, boasting the world’s largest military aircraft repair facility, Tinker Air Force Base, and the world’s largest commercial aircraft repair facility, the American Airlines Engineering Maintenance and Engineering Center in Tulsa.

In addition, Oklahoma has 113 publicly owned airports, placing it fourth nationally for the number of public airports per capita. A total of 42 of those airports are jet capable, meaning their runways are at least 5,000 feet long, the minimum distance needed by most jet aircraft to safely land or take off. Approximately 93 percent of the state’s population lives within 25 miles of an airport with a jet-capable runway.

Dr. David Conway re-appointed to Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission

Dr. David Conway re-appointed to Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission

Press Release Date: 1-17-2011

David Conway

DURANT, Okla. – Dr. David Conway, director of the Southeastern Oklahoma State University Aviation Sciences Institute, was recently re-appointed to a six-year term on the Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission.

Outgoing Gov. Brad Henry made the appointment.

Conway was originally appointed to the commission in 2009 to fill the vacated seat of Commissioner Mel Stubbing. He currently serves as secretary of the Commission.

The Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission’s mission is to promote aviation, which includes fostering the growth of the aerospace industry and ensuring that the needs of commerce and communities across Oklahoma are met by the 114 public airports that comprise the state’s air transportation system.

Conway earned a bachelor’s degree at Texas A&M-Commerce, a master’s at the University of Southern California, and his Ed. D. at Oklahoma State University. He joined the SE faculty in 1998.